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Granny Flat Bigger than 60m2 ?; Possible with DA application?
Topic Started: 24 Jan 2012, 01:02 PM (7,903 Views)
mooks
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Wondering if anyone know whether a bigger than 60m2 secondary dwelling is possible assuming you meet all the setback/floorspace ratios/landscape ratios of your council.

E.g.

Primary Dwelling, 150m2
Proposed Secondary Dwelling, 100m2
Land size, 950m2

Understand that for 10 day approval, you must be 60m2 or less.



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Frank Castle
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Business As Usual

Make the call
The forum is a better place with the forum fuckwits and their spank socks on ignore
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mooks
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Frank Castle
24 Jan 2012, 02:08 PM
Make the call
You mean, make the call to the council?

I've asked 2 builders, they say "Definitely No", not even with a DA approval.

They said, simply, "Granny Flat" = "Secondary Dwelling"

Granny flat cannot exceed 60m2, except in one or two councils where it is 65m2. (hurstville)
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nipa hut
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mooks
24 Jan 2012, 02:26 PM
You mean, make the call to the council?

I've asked 2 builders, they say "Definitely No", not even with a DA approval.

They said, simply, "Granny Flat" = "Secondary Dwelling"

Granny flat cannot exceed 60m2, except in one or two councils where it is 65m2. (hurstville)
1) You haven't specified your location, which is likely relevant.

2) Builders aren't lawyers. They're likely to be broadly aware of local planning ordinance, which means the "definitely no" is likely correct from the perspective of their sweet spot in approvable buildings/extensions.

But if the question is important to you, then $200 - $300 spent with a DA-oriented solicitor may well uncover different ways of looking at the buildable potential of your property.
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zaph
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nipa hut
24 Jan 2012, 03:06 PM
1) You haven't specified your location, which is likely relevant.

2) Builders aren't lawyers. They're likely to be broadly aware of local planning ordinance, which means the "definitely no" is likely correct from the perspective of their sweet spot in approvable buildings/extensions.

But if the question is important to you, then $200 - $300 spent with a DA-oriented solicitor may well uncover different ways of looking at the buildable potential of your property.
isn't a town planner the more appropriate person?
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nipa hut
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zaph
24 Jan 2012, 03:17 PM
isn't a town planner the more appropriate person?
Town planner vs solicitor = passive vs aggressive.

Is the OP simply curious what can be done, or does s/he want a particular result (or the closest thing to it that can be argued past council)?
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mooks
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nipa hut
24 Jan 2012, 03:36 PM
Town planner vs solicitor = passive vs aggressive.

Is the OP simply curious what can be done, or does s/he want a particular result (or the closest thing to it that can be argued past council)?
Objective: I would like 100m2 of living space on a 920m2 block of land.

Existing house: No greater than 150m2. This means that the combined Floor space of the two dwellings would easily come under 40% rule.

When asked, can bigger than 60m2 granny be built? Granny Flat Builders say to me: Not possible, but we can build you "Alfresco" areas (dodgy) and you can then seal up the wall later. They tell me that as long as I dont sell the main property, there are no issues.

My thoughts are, what if a nosy neighbour discovered this and dobbed me in, could the council then visit my site, verify that that my structure is unapproved and then demand I remove it?

Hence, I want to do it properly even if it means a longer approval process.

I guess if no one knows, then the first port of call is the local council (Hornsby)


Apparently, if you comply with the Granny Flat SEPP from the state government, you can bypass Council Approval altogether. Hence, 10 day approval.


FYI, for those of you that read my rent vs buy thread, I've decided that neither is my preferred option. Big Granny Flats are a good interim solution for many reasons. Instead of getting 400k of debt for a PPoR, I'd only use up a little over half my savings to build a granny.





Edited by mooks, 24 Jan 2012, 03:49 PM.
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zaph
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nipa hut
24 Jan 2012, 03:36 PM
Town planner vs solicitor = passive vs aggressive.

Is the OP simply curious what can be done, or does s/he want a particular result (or the closest thing to it that can be argued past council)?
passive with mates in council may be what you need for a tiny development like this. a lawyer may be overkill and over expensive. if you were building a high rise block with 100's of units you'd want an aggressive solicitor who would spend 10's of thousands arguing about the meaning of 'if' to get you over the line on favourable terms.

gaining agreement with council would be better than arguing with council over such a small matter.

i'd be interested in Franks take on the situation, but i suspect he's holding back and having a giggle at us novices.

# i know little of this area, so i could be very wrong.
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peter fraser
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zaph
24 Jan 2012, 03:49 PM
nipa hut
24 Jan 2012, 03:36 PM
Town planner vs solicitor = passive vs aggressive.

Is the OP simply curious what can be done, or does s/he want a particular result (or the closest thing to it that can be argued past council)?
passive with mates in council may be what you need for a tiny development like this. a lawyer may be overkill and over expensive. if you were building a high rise block with 100's of units you'd want an aggressive solicitor who would spend 10's of thousands arguing about the meaning of 'if' to get you over the line on favourable terms.

gaining agreement with council would be better than arguing with council over such a small matter.

i'd be interested in Franks take on the situation, but i suspect he's holding back and having a giggle at us novices.

# i know little of this area, so i could be very wrong.
It all depends on what you call the space. If your architect denotes it as storage you can get away with almost anything.

You could have living space with a storage room attached, that later magically becomes the living area for the granny flat. You can build in anything later, but you do need to plan for water intake plumbing and sewerage outlets. They can go through the wall and be added later, but if you want the sewerage outlets in the slab then you must allow for that in the pour.

Technically you shouldn't, but if you don't rent it out no one will ever care. Many "downstairs" areas in Qld are technically in breach of living area requirements due to height, but no one ever checks.

I would personally not use the term "granny flat" - perhaps just call it a shed or artists studio - mortgage insurers occasionally get difficult with granny flats.






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Frank Castle
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Business As Usual

Two minutes gives me this

Quote:
 
What are the requirements for a granny flat?
Granny flats are now permitted in all residential
zones across the State, subject to meeting the
following requirements:
*There is only one house and one granny flat
on the lot
*The combined total floor area of the house and
the granny flat complies with the floor space
area controls in the local environment plan
*The maximum floor area of the granny flat is
no greater than:
60 square metres;

OR
The maximum floor area prescribed by
the council in the local environmental
plan

*The lot is not subdivided
*The granny flat meets planning controls
such as building height and setbacks, floor
space ratios, and open space in the local
environmental plan and/or the complying
development provisions in the Affordable
Rental Housing SEPP.
*The granny flat meets the requirements of
the Building Code of Australia.

http://www.planning.nsw.gov.au/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=eCNg9MQW0UU%3D&tabid=315


Pretty sure we get 100m2 in QLD
The forum is a better place with the forum fuckwits and their spank socks on ignore
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